The online tool for teaching with documents, from the National Archives

How Have Americans Responded to Immigration?

Weighing the Evidence

All documents and text associated with this activity are printed below, followed by a worksheet for student responses.

Introduction

You will see documents that may give you some indication of whether or not immigration was welcomed in the United States at different times. Be sure to click on the orange Details icon to explore the entire document.  Pay attention to the dates to understand the time period covered.

Analyze each document and move it to to the scale according to how strongly you think it supports one side or the other.


Name:
Class:

Worksheet

How Have Americans Responded to Immigration?

Weighing the Evidence

Examine the documents and text included in this activity. Consider how each document does or does not support two opposing interpretations or conclusions. Fill in the topic or interpretations if they are not provided. To show how the documents support the different interpretations, enter the corresponding document number into the boxes near the interpretation. Write your conclusion response in the space provided.

Interpretation 1
America welcomes new immigrants and opens her doors to them.

How have Americans responded to immigration?
Interpretation 2
Americans are fearful or skeptical of new immigrants and have tried to exclude them.



1

Activity Element

Secretary of the US Department of Homeland Security, Michael Chertoff, introduces President George W. Bush at the US Chamber of Commerce where President Bush gave a speech on Immigration

Page 1



2

Activity Element

Photograph of President Lyndon B. Johnson Signing the Immigration Act

Page 1



3

Activity Element

News from the U.S. Department of Labor, "Federal Stop-Order on Indio Farmer" (USDL-IX-59S56), San Francisco, August 3, 1959.

Page 1



4

Activity Element

Memorandum from Harry S. Truman to the Secretary of State and Others

Page 1



5

Activity Element

Act of December 17, 1943, Public Law 78-199, 57 STAT 600, to repeal the Chinese Exclusion Acts, and for other purposes

Page 1



6

Activity Element

Oath of Allegiance of Mikael Amerikian

Page 1



7

Activity Element

"Remember Your First Thrill of American Liberty. Your Duty- Buy United States Government Bonds. 2nd Liberty Loan of 1917."

Page 2



8

Activity Element

Interrogation of Lev Kotz, alias Lebe Nissinoff, "Russian Hebrew," by federal Immigration Board of Special Inquiry, Angel Island Immigration Station

Page 4



9

Activity Element

Photograph of Immigrants Landing at Ellis Island

Page 1



10

Activity Element

Photograph of Immigrants Arriving at the Immigration Station on Angel Island

Page 1



11

Activity Element

Manifest of Alien Immigrants for the SS Brasilia

Page 1



12

Activity Element

Flyers Distributed by Silver Bow Trades and Labor Assembly and Butte Miners` Union in Support of Chinese and Japanese Boycott

Page 1



13

Activity Element

Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798

Page 1



14

Activity Element

Texas of North America

Page 2



15

Activity Element

A Bill to Establish an Uniform Rule of Naturalization, and Enable Aliens to Hold Lands under Certain Conditions

Page 1



16

Activity Element

Incident Memorandum Regarding Cuban Refugees, Southern Florida

Page 1



17

Activity Element

Foreign-Born Friends who are Applicants for American Citizenship

Page 1



18

Activity Element

Letter from German Hospital to Commissioner of Immigration, Angel Island Station, regarding enemy alien Ernst Hamann

Page 1



Conclusion

How Have Americans Responded to Immigration?

Weighing the Evidence

Thinking about the dates for the documents, what time period is covered?

In a couple of sentences, explain one or two observations you made about how American attitudes toward immigration have changed over the years. Under what circumstances were immigrants more likely to be welcomed? More likely to be feared?

Respond in one sentence: You saw just a small selection of possible documents that could indicate how Americans responded to immigration at different times. What other kinds of documents would you look for if you were researching the history of American attitudes on this topic?

Your Response




Document

Secretary of the US Department of Homeland Security, Michael Chertoff, introduces President George W. Bush at the US Chamber of Commerce where President Bush gave a speech on Immigration

6/1/2006

This primary source comes from the Records of the Federal Emergency Management Agency.
National Archives Identifier: 5695337
Full Citation: Secretary of the US Department of Homeland Security, Michael Chertoff, introduces President George W. Bush at the US Chamber of Commerce where President Bush gave a speech on Immigration; 6/1/2006; Records of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, . [Online Version, https://www.docsteach.org/documents/document/secretary-of-the-us-department-of-homeland-security-michael-chertoff-introduces-president-george-w-bush-at-the-us-chamber-of-commerce-where-president-bush-gave-a-speech-on-immigration, August 14, 2020]


Secretary of the US Department of Homeland Security, Michael Chertoff, introduces President George W. Bush at the US Chamber of Commerce where President Bush gave a speech on Immigration

Page 1



Document

Photograph of President Lyndon B. Johnson Signing the Immigration Act

10/3/1965

In this photograph, President Lyndon B. Johnson signs the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 at the Statue of Liberty. Vice President Hubert Humphrey, Lady Bird Johnson, Muriel Humphrey, Senator Edward (Ted) Kennedy, Senator Robert F. Kennedy, and others look on.

This law ended the "national origins formula" that had been in place since the 1920s.

The original caption reads: Outdoor photograph, sunny day. Wide view of large group of people. Hubert Humphrey and Mrs. Johnson are looking down at President Johnson picking up pen. Ted Kennedy is looking to right of frame, and Robert Kennedy has hand up to chin, smiling. New York City skyline is in background.
This primary source comes from the Collection LBJ-WHPO: White House Photo Office Collection.
National Archives Identifier: 2803428
Full Citation: Photograph A1421-33A; Photograph of President Lyndon B. Johnson Signing the Immigration Act; 10/3/1965; Johnson White House Photographs, 11/22/1963 - 1/20/1969; Collection LBJ-WHPO: White House Photo Office Collection, ; Lyndon Baines Johnson Library, Austin, TX. [Online Version, https://www.docsteach.org/documents/document/lbj-immigration-act, August 14, 2020]


Photograph of President Lyndon B. Johnson Signing the Immigration Act

Page 1



Document

News from the U.S. Department of Labor, "Federal Stop-Order on Indio Farmer" (USDL-IX-59S56), San Francisco, August 3, 1959.

August 3, 1959

This primary source comes from the General Records of the Department of Labor.
National Archives Identifier: 296747
Full Citation: News from the U.S. Department of Labor, "Federal Stop-Order on Indio Farmer" (USDL-IX-59S56), San Francisco, August 3, 1959.; August 3, 1959; General Records of the Department of Labor, . [Online Version, https://www.docsteach.org/documents/document/news-from-the-us-department-of-labor-federal-stoporder-on-indio-farmer-usdlix59s56-san-francisco-august-3-1959, August 14, 2020]


News from the U.S. Department of Labor, "Federal Stop-Order on Indio Farmer" (USDL-IX-59S56), San Francisco, August 3, 1959.

Page 1



Document

Memorandum from Harry S. Truman to the Secretary of State and Others

12/22/1945

This primary source comes from the Collection HST-OFF: Official Files (Truman Administration).
National Archives Identifier: 201127
Full Citation: Memorandum from Harry S. Truman to the Secretary of State and Others; 12/22/1945; Collection HST-OFF: Official Files (Truman Administration), . [Online Version, https://www.docsteach.org/documents/document/memorandum-from-harry-s-truman-to-the-secretary-of-state-and-others, August 14, 2020]


Memorandum from Harry S. Truman to the Secretary of State and Others

Page 1



Memorandum from Harry S. Truman to the Secretary of State and Others

Page 2



Memorandum from Harry S. Truman to the Secretary of State and Others

Page 3



Document

Act of December 17, 1943, Public Law 78-199, 57 STAT 600, to repeal the Chinese Exclusion Acts, and for other purposes

12/17/1943

This primary source comes from the General Records of the United States Government.
National Archives Identifier: 299853
Full Citation: Act of December 17, 1943, Public Law 78-199, 57 STAT 600, to repeal the Chinese Exclusion Acts, and for other purposes; 12/17/1943; General Records of the United States Government, . [Online Version, https://www.docsteach.org/documents/document/act-of-december-17-1943-public-law-78199-57-stat-600-to-repeal-the-chinese-exclusion-acts-and-for-other-purposes, August 14, 2020]


Act of December 17, 1943, Public Law 78-199, 57 STAT 600, to repeal the Chinese Exclusion Acts, and for other purposes

Page 1



Act of December 17, 1943, Public Law 78-199, 57 STAT 600, to repeal the Chinese Exclusion Acts, and for other purposes

Page 2



Document

Oath of Allegiance of Mikael Amerikian

10/6/1931

Mikael Amerikian swore an oath of allegiance to the United States and renounced his allegiance to the Republic of Turkey on October 6, 1931, in Portland, Maine. This oath was an important step on Amerikian’s path to citizenship.
This primary source comes from the Records of District Courts of the United States.
National Archives Identifier: 595054
Full Citation: Oath of Allegiance of Mikael Amerikian; 10/6/1931; Records of District Courts of the United States, . [Online Version, https://www.docsteach.org/documents/document/oath-of-allegiance-of-mikael-amerikian, August 14, 2020]


Oath of Allegiance of Mikael Amerikian

Page 1



Document

"Remember Your First Thrill of American Liberty. Your Duty- Buy United States Government Bonds. 2nd Liberty Loan of 1917."

1917

The United States Food Administration’s Education Division created this poster during the First World War to encourage newly arrived immigrants to support the Federal government by purchasing Liberty Bonds to fund the war. The second Liberty Loan of 1917 offered $3 billion in bonds with a return of four percent.
This primary source comes from the Records of the U.S. Food Administration.
National Archives Identifier: 512676
Full Citation: "Remember Your First Thrill of American Liberty. Your Duty- Buy United States Government Bonds. 2nd Liberty Loan of 1917."; 1917; Records of the U.S. Food Administration, . [Online Version, https://www.docsteach.org/documents/document/remember-your-first-thrill-of-american-liberty-your-duty-buy-united-states-government-bonds-2nd-liberty-loan-of-1917, August 14, 2020]


"Remember Your First Thrill of American Liberty. Your Duty- Buy United States Government Bonds. 2nd Liberty Loan of 1917."

Page 2



Document

Interrogation of Lev Kotz, alias Lebe Nissinoff, "Russian Hebrew," by federal Immigration Board of Special Inquiry, Angel Island Immigration Station

1/4/1916 - 1/5/1916

This primary source comes from the Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service.
National Archives Identifier: 296475
Full Citation: Interrogation of Lev Kotz, alias Lebe Nissinoff, "Russian Hebrew," by federal Immigration Board of Special Inquiry, Angel Island Immigration Station; 1/4/1916 - 1/5/1916; Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, . [Online Version, https://www.docsteach.org/documents/document/interrogation-of-lev-kotz-alias-lebe-nissinoff-russian-hebrew-by-federal-immigration-board-of-special-inquiry-angel-island-immigration-station, August 14, 2020]


Interrogation of Lev Kotz, alias Lebe Nissinoff, "Russian Hebrew," by federal Immigration Board of Special Inquiry, Angel Island Immigration Station

Page 1



Interrogation of Lev Kotz, alias Lebe Nissinoff, "Russian Hebrew," by federal Immigration Board of Special Inquiry, Angel Island Immigration Station

Page 2



Interrogation of Lev Kotz, alias Lebe Nissinoff, "Russian Hebrew," by federal Immigration Board of Special Inquiry, Angel Island Immigration Station

Page 3



Interrogation of Lev Kotz, alias Lebe Nissinoff, "Russian Hebrew," by federal Immigration Board of Special Inquiry, Angel Island Immigration Station

Page 4



Document

Photograph of Immigrants Landing at Ellis Island

ca. 1900

After long and uncomfortable voyages, immigrants of all ages and nationalities poured through Ellis Island, the immigration processing center at the Port of New York. Between 1892 and 1924, an estimated 20 million individuals began their lives in America here
This primary source comes from the Records of the Public Health Service.
National Archives Identifier: 595034
Full Citation: Photograph of Immigrants Landing at Ellis Island; ca. 1900; Records of the Public Health Service, . [Online Version, https://www.docsteach.org/documents/document/photograph-of-immigrants-landing-at-ellis-island, August 14, 2020]


Photograph of Immigrants Landing at Ellis Island

Page 1



Document

Photograph of Immigrants Arriving at the Immigration Station on Angel Island

ca. 1931

This undated photograph captures just a few of the millions of Asian immigrants to pass through Angel Island, in California’s San Francisco Bay. Now a National Historic Landmark and State Park, Angel Island served as a U.S. Immigration Station from 1910 until 1941. Although immigrants were usually detained here for a week or two in a housing compound for processing, some spent as long as two years for health reasons.
This primary source comes from the Records of the Public Health Service.
National Archives Identifier: 595673
Full Citation: Photograph of Immigrants Arriving at the Immigration Station on Angel Island; ca. 1931; Public Health Service Historical Photograph File, 1880 - 1943; Records of the Public Health Service, . [Online Version, https://www.docsteach.org/documents/document/photograph-of-immigrants-arriving-at-the-immigration-station-on-angel-island, August 14, 2020]


Photograph of Immigrants Arriving at the Immigration Station on Angel Island

Page 1



Document

Manifest of Alien Immigrants for the SS Brasilia

1/31/1899

This manifest contains the names of immigrants who arrived on the S.S. Brasilia from Hamburg, Germany, on January 31, 1899. In addition to standard information such as name and age, this 19th-century form requests that each respondent identify who paid for his passage on the ship and whether or not he is a polygamist.
This primary source comes from the Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service.
National Archives Identifier: 596307
Full Citation: Manifest of Alien Immigrants for the SS Brasilia; 1/31/1899; Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, . [Online Version, https://www.docsteach.org/documents/document/manifest-of-alien-immigrants-for-the-ss-brasilia, August 14, 2020]


Manifest of Alien Immigrants for the SS Brasilia

Page 1



Document

Flyers Distributed by Silver Bow Trades and Labor Assembly and Butte Miners' Union in Support of Chinese and Japanese Boycott

ca. 8/1898

This primary source comes from the Records of District Courts of the United States.
National Archives Identifier: 298113
Full Citation: Flyers Distributed by Silver Bow Trades and Labor Assembly and Butte Miners' Union in Support of Chinese and Japanese Boycott; ca. 8/1898; Records of District Courts of the United States, . [Online Version, https://www.docsteach.org/documents/document/flyers-distributed-by-silver-bow-trades-and-labor-assembly-and-butte-miners-union-in-support-of-chinese-and-japanese-boycott, August 14, 2020]


Flyers Distributed by Silver Bow Trades and Labor Assembly and Butte Miners' Union in Support of Chinese and Japanese Boycott

Page 1



Flyers Distributed by Silver Bow Trades and Labor Assembly and Butte Miners' Union in Support of Chinese and Japanese Boycott

Page 2



Flyers Distributed by Silver Bow Trades and Labor Assembly and Butte Miners' Union in Support of Chinese and Japanese Boycott

Page 3



Document

Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798

1798

Passed in preparation for an anticipated war with France, the Alien and Sedition Acts tightened restrictions on foreign-born Americans and limited speech critical of the Government.

In 1798 the United States stood on the brink of war with France. The Federalists believed that Democratic-Republican criticism of Federalist policies was disloyal and feared that aliens living in the United States would sympathize with the French during a war. As a result, a Federalist-controlled Congress passed four laws, known collectively as the Alien and Sedition Acts.

The Alien Acts raised the residency requirements for citizenship from 5 to 14 years, authorized the President to deport aliens, and permitted their arrest, imprisonment, and deportation during wartime. The Sedition Act made it a crime for American citizens to "print, utter, or publish...any false, scandalous, and malicious writing" about the Government.

The laws were directed against Democratic-Republicans, the party typically favored by new citizens, and the only journalists prosecuted under the Sedition Act were editors of Democratic-Republican newspapers. Sedition Act trials, along with the Senate’s use of its contempt powers to suppress dissent, set off a firestorm of criticism against the Federalists and contributed to their defeat in the election of 1800, after which the acts were repealed or allowed to expire. The controversies surrounding them, however, provided for some of the first testings of the limits of freedom of speech and press.

Transcript

FIFTH CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES:
At the Second Session,
Begun and help at the city of Philadelphia, in the state of Pennsylvania, on Monday, the thirteenth of November, one thousand seven hundred and ninety-seven.

An Act Concerning Aliens.

SECTION 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and the House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That it shall be lawful for the President of the United States at any time during the continuance of this act, to order all such aliens as he shall judge dangerous to the peace and safety of the United States, or shall have reasonable grounds to suspect are concerned in any treasonable or secret machinations against the government thereof, to depart out of the territory of the United Slates, within such time as shall be expressed in such order, which order shall be served on such alien by delivering him a copy thereof, or leaving the same at his usual abode, and returned to the office of the Secretary of State, by the marshal or other person to whom the same shall be directed. And in case any alien, so ordered to depart, shall be found at large within the United States after the time limited in such order for his departure, and not having obtained a license from the President to reside therein, or having obtained such license shall not have conformed thereto, every such alien shall, on conviction thereof, be imprisoned for a term not exceeding three years, and shall never after be admitted to become a citizen of the United States. Provided always, and be it further enacted, that if any alien so ordered to depart shall prove to the satisfaction of the President, by evidence to be taken before such person or persons as the President shall direct, who are for that purpose hereby authorized to administer oaths, that no injury or danger to the United Slates will arise from suffering such alien to reside therein, the President may grant a license to such alien to remain within the United States for such time as he shall judge proper, and at such place as he may designate. And the President may also require of such alien to enter into a bond to the United States, in such penal sum as he may direct, with one or more sufficient sureties to the satisfaction of the per- son authorized by the President to take the same, conditioned for the good behavior of such alien during his residence in the United States, and not violating his license, which license the President may revoke, whenever he shall think proper .

SEC. 2. And be it further enacted, That it shall be lawful for the President of the United States, whenever he may deem it necessary (for the public safety, to order to be removed out of the territory thereof, any alien who mayor shall be in prison in pursuance of this act; and to cause to be arrested and sent out of the United States such of those aliens as shall have been ordered to depart therefrom and shall not have obtained a license as aforesaid, in all cases where, in the opinion of the President, the public safety requires a speedy removal. And if any alien so removed or sent out of the United Slates by the President shall voluntarily return thereto, unless by permission of the President of the United States, such alien on conviction thereof, shall be imprisoned so long as, in the opinion of the President, the public safety may require.

SEC. 3. And be it further enacted, That every master or commander of any ship or vessel which shall come into any port of the United States after the first day of July next, shall immediately on his arrival make report in writing to the collector or other chief officer of the customs of such port, of all aliens, if any, on board his vessel, specifying their names, age, the place of nativity, the country from which they shall have come, the nation to which they belong and owe allegiance, their occupation and a description of their persons, as far as he shall be informed thereof, and on failure, every such master and commander shall forfeit and pay three hundred dollars, for the payment whereof on default of such master or commander, such vessel shall also be holden, and may by such collector or other officer of the customs be detained. And it shall be the duty of such collector or other officer of the customs, forthwith to transmit to the office of the department of state true copies of all such returns.

SEC. 4. And be it further enacted, That the circuit and district courts of the United States, shall respectively have cognizance of all crimes and offences against this act. And all marshals and other officers of the United States are required to execute all precepts and orders of the President of the United States issued in pursuance or by virtue of this act.

SEC. 5. And be it further enacted, That it shall be lawful for any alien who may be ordered to be removed from the United States, by virtue of this act, to take with him such part of his goods, chattels, or other property, as he may find convenient; and all property left in the United States by any alien, who may be removed, as aforesaid, shall be, and re- main subject to his order and disposal, in the same manner as if this act had not been passed.

SEC. 6. And be it further enacted, That this act shall continue and be in force for and during the term of two years from the passing thereof.

Jonathan Dayton, Speaker of the House of Representatives.
TH. Jefferson, Vice President of the United States and President of the Sentate.

I Certify that this Act did originate in the Sentate.
Attest, Sam. A. Otis, Secretary

APPROVED, June 25, 1798.
John Adams
President of the United States.



FIFTH CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES:
At the Second Session,
Begun and help at the city of Philadelphia, in the state of Pennsylvania, on Monday, the thirteenth of November, one thousand seven hundred and ninety-seven.

An Act in Addition to the Act, Entitled "An Act for the Punishment of Certain Crimes Against the United States."

SECTION 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America, in Congress assembled, That if any persons shall unlawfully combine or conspire together, with intent to oppose any measure or measures of the government of the United States, which are or shall be directed by proper authority, or to impede the operation of any law of the United States, or to intimidate or prevent any person holding a place or office in or under the government of the United States, from undertaking, performing or executing his trust or duty, and if any person or persons, with intent as aforesaid, shall counsel, advise or attempt to procure any insurrection, riot, unlawful assembly, or combination, whether such conspiracy, threatening, counsel, advice, or attempt shall have the proposed effect or not, he or they shall be deemed guilty of a high misdemeanor, and on conviction, before any court of the United States having jurisdiction thereof, shall be punished by a fine not exceeding five thousand dollars, and by imprisonment during a term not less than six months nor exceeding five years; and further, at the discretion of the court may be holden to find sureties for his good behaviour in such sum, and for such time, as the said court may direct.

SEC. 2. And be it farther enacted, That if any person shall write, print, utter or publish, or shall cause or procure to be written, printed, uttered or published, or shall knowingly and willingly assist or aid in writing, printing, uttering or publishing any false, scandalous and malicious writing or writings against the government of the United States, or either house of the Congress of the United States, or the President of the United States, with intent to defame the said government, or either house of the said Congress, or the said President, or to bring them, or either of them, into contempt or disrepute; or to excite against them, or either or any of them, the hatred of the good people of the United States, or to stir up sedition within the United States, or to excite any unlawful combinations therein, for opposing or resisting any law of the United States, or any act of the President of the United States, done in pursuance of any such law, or of the powers in him vested by the constitution of the United States, or to resist, oppose, or defeat any such law or act, or to aid, encourage or abet any hostile designs of any foreign nation against United States, their people or government, then such person, being thereof convicted before any court of the United States having jurisdiction thereof, shall be punished by a fine not exceeding two thousand dollars, and by imprisonment not exceeding two years.

SEC. 3. And be it further enacted and declared, That if any person shall be prosecuted under this act, for the writing or publishing any libel aforesaid, it shall be lawful for the defendant, upon the trial of the cause, to give in evidence in his defence, the truth of the matter contained in publication charged as a libel. And the jury who shall try the cause, shall have a right to determine the law and the fact, under the direction of the court, as in other cases.

SEC. 4. And be it further enacted, That this act shall continue and be in force until the third day of March, one thousand eight hundred and one, and no longer: Provided, that the expiration of the act shall not prevent or defeat a prosecution and punishment of any offence against the law, during the time it shall be in force.

Jonathan Dayton, Speaker of the House of Representatives.
Theodore Sedgwick, President of the Sentate pro tempore.

I Certify that this Act did originate in the Sentate.
Attest, Sam. A. Otis, Secretary

APPROVED, July 14, 1798
John Adams
President of the United States.
This primary source comes from the General Records of the United States Government.
National Archives Identifier: 5641586
Full Citation: Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798; 1798; Enrolled Acts and Resolutions of Congress, 1789 - 2011; General Records of the United States Government, ; National Archives Building, Washington, DC. [Online Version, https://www.docsteach.org/documents/document/alien-sedition-acts, August 14, 2020]


Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798

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Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798

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Document

Texas of North America

ca. 1909

This primary source comes from the Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service.
National Archives Identifier: 7459465
Full Citation: Texas of North America; ca. 1909; Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, . [Online Version, https://www.docsteach.org/documents/document/texas-of-north-america, August 14, 2020]


Texas of North America

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Texas of North America

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Document

A Bill to Establish an Uniform Rule of Naturalization, and Enable Aliens to Hold Lands under Certain Conditions

3/4/1790

H.R. 40, a Bill to Establish an Uniform Rule of Naturalization and Enable Aliens to Hold Lands under Certain Conditions, was introduced in the Senate on March 4, 1790. The bill provided that “any Alien being a free white person” who had resided within the United States for two years could file a petition for naturalization in any common law court located in a state in which they had resided for at least one year. After “making proof to the satisfaction of such Court that he is a person of good character, and taking the oath or affirmation prescribed by law to support the Constitution of the United States,” such person would become a citizen. It also provided citizenship for children of U.S. citizens who were born abroad.

The Naturalization Act of 1790 was signed into law on March 26, 1790.
This primary source comes from the Records of the U.S. Senate.
National Archives Identifier: 7452136
Full Citation: A Bill to Establish an Uniform Rule of Naturalization, and Enable Aliens to Hold Lands under Certain Conditions; 3/4/1790; (SEN1A-C1); Bills and Resolutions Originating in the House and Considered in the Senate, 1789 - 2002; Records of the U.S. Senate, ; National Archives Building,Washington, DC. [Online Version, https://www.docsteach.org/documents/document/naturalization-act-of-1790, August 14, 2020]


A Bill to Establish an Uniform Rule of Naturalization, and Enable Aliens to Hold Lands under Certain Conditions

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A Bill to Establish an Uniform Rule of Naturalization, and Enable Aliens to Hold Lands under Certain Conditions

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Document

Incident Memorandum Regarding Cuban Refugees, Southern Florida

4/24/1980

This primary source comes from the Records of the U.S. Coast Guard.
National Archives Identifier: 7455545
Full Citation: Incident Memorandum Regarding Cuban Refugees, Southern Florida; 4/24/1980; Records of the U.S. Coast Guard, . [Online Version, https://www.docsteach.org/documents/document/incident-memorandum-regarding-cuban-refugees-southern-florida, August 14, 2020]


Incident Memorandum Regarding Cuban Refugees, Southern Florida

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Incident Memorandum Regarding Cuban Refugees, Southern Florida

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Document

Foreign-Born Friends who are Applicants for American Citizenship

1922

This primary source comes from the Publications of the U.S. Government.
National Archives Identifier: 7452511
Full Citation: Foreign-Born Friends who are Applicants for American Citizenship; 1922; Publications of the U.S. Government, . [Online Version, https://www.docsteach.org/documents/document/foreignborn-friends-who-are-applicants-for-american-citizenship, August 14, 2020]


Foreign-Born Friends who are Applicants for American Citizenship

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Document

Letter from German Hospital to Commissioner of Immigration, Angel Island Station, regarding enemy alien Ernst Hamann

10/12/1917

This primary source comes from the Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service.
National Archives Identifier: 296434
Full Citation: Letter from German Hospital to Commissioner of Immigration, Angel Island Station, regarding enemy alien Ernst Hamann; 10/12/1917; Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, . [Online Version, https://www.docsteach.org/documents/document/letter-from-german-hospital-to-commissioner-of-immigration-angel-island-station-regarding-enemy-alien-ernst-hamann, August 14, 2020]


Letter from German Hospital to Commissioner of Immigration, Angel Island Station, regarding enemy alien Ernst Hamann

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