The online tool for teaching with documents, from the National Archives

The Constitution in Action: Articles V,VI,VII (Lab Team 6)

Focusing on Details: Discussion Topic

All documents and text associated with this activity are printed below, followed by a worksheet for student responses.

Introduction

Carefully examine the document on the screen. As you analyze the document, think about how it connects to Article V,VI, or VII of the Constitution and what big idea is contained in it by answering the questions below. Use the magnifying glass icon in the blue menu bar at the bottom of the document to zoom in and get a closer look and/or click on "View Entire Document" for more information.


Name:
Class:

Worksheet

The Constitution in Action: Articles V,VI,VII (Lab Team 6)

Focusing on Details: Discussion Topic

Examine the documents included in this activity and write your response in the space provided.


  • What names do you see in this document?
  • Are there any dates contained in this document? If so, what are they?
  • Are there any locations (cities, states, offices) specified in this document?
  • What is the main idea of this document? What is it about?
  • Why was this document created?
  • How does this document connect to Article V, VI, or VII of the U.S. Constitution?
  • What big idea of the Constitution is contained in this document?

Your Response




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Activity Element

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Conclusion

The Constitution in Action: Articles V,VI,VII (Lab Team 6)

Focusing on Details: Discussion Topic

Now that you have carefully examined the document, connected it back to the Constitution, and selected a big idea, write the following information:

  • Identify and describe the document.
  • Identify the specific article and section that connects to the document.
  • Quote the actual wording of the Constitution from the article and section identified.
  • Identify the big idea you chose and explain why this document is a good example of that idea.


Your Response




Document

Senator Lyndon B. Johnson's Oath of Office

1/5/1955

This is the oath of office signed by Lyndon Johnson in 1955 when he was elected to the Senate. From his service in the Senate, he became Vice President and then President in 1963. Government officials are required to take an oath of office. Since the first law passed by Congress in 1789, all Members of Congress, all Federal officials, and all state executives, legislatures, and judiciaries have taken an oath to support the Constitution.
This primary source comes from the Records of the U.S. Senate.
National Archives Identifier: 1157526
Full Citation: Senator Lyndon B. Johnson's Oath of Office; 1/5/1955; Records of the U.S. Senate, . [Online Version, https://www.docsteach.org/documents/document/senator-lyndon-b-johnsons-oath-of-office, July 3, 2020]


Senator Lyndon B. Johnson's Oath of Office

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